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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
need help. we desperately need help in the new york, new jersey area. last night two billion people around the world tuned into a benefit concert to help raise money for sand's reliefestings and now it is time for the government to step up to the place. congress has stepped up 39 times to help state and local governments to respond to disasters. there is a wisdom here that has been in the federal government for decades. that is, when god's hand strikes no localities can handle it on their own. we unite as a nation to help one another. following katrina the government passed aid following 10 days of after the storm. we passed nine fundamentals a total of $108 billion and frankly, the damage from sandy, the economic damage is worse. they lost about 270,000 homes and in new york we lost 305,000 homes. that is new york alone. they had about 20,000 small businesses, put out of business, gone. we have over 270,000. so the damage is enormous. and you know, we members of new york delegation have always been there when other parts of the nation were struck by distafters. new york tax dollars
to webster new york for services honoring two firefighters killed on duty. they were gunned down trying to put out a fire on christmas eve. the gunman torched his home and opened fire and later committed suicide. the two firefighters will be buried sunday and monday. those from around the u.s. are there for the funerals and thanks to local donations many are staying at local hotels for free. >> it's the out pouring of the community, we had people from florida, michigan have been calling in to donate hotel rooms. >> hotels are holding special receptions today through monday as well for webster firefighters and family members of the victims. >> it's been two weeks since a gunman killed 27 people in connecticut before taking his own life. now scientists will analyze the dna of 20 year old adam lanza. genetic specialists will be looking for a mutation or abnormality that could increase aggressive or violent behavior. however people that carry the same or similar signs in their dna will be stigmatized. >> a new york woman is facing several charges after she set up a charity scam following th
news" -- also "l.a. times" -- i will take to "a "boston globe"" -- "the boston globe" -- the new york post -- the story i want to start with this morning is from politico. that line is -- senate leaders are headed into a critical sunday session of congress with a similar mission to avoid historic tax hikes, setting the stage for a high wire a final act of fiscal cliff negotiating just two days before the country is hit with a series of tough austerity measures. -- that again is from politico this morning. you're getting your thoughts, and we want to hear your message to congress on the fiscal cliff negotiations. the politico story mentioned what was happening on saturday evening on capitol hill. here is the washington post -- the washington post also offers a handy time line of what is set to happen today in the countdown to the cliff. at 1:00 p.m., the senate is set to reconvene. at 2:00 p.m., the house reopens. -- tonight or tomorrow, on monday -- that is our schedule, the fiscal cliff count down today. i want to turn out to nancy cook of the national journal. she is here to give us
believe the gunman lay in wait for at least 40 minutes. woodard checked out of a posh new york city hotel, the shooter followed. witnesses say the victim looked at his phone and turned back instinctively, but kept going. that's when police say the shooter raised a semiautomatic pistol and shot woodard once in the back of the head. >> one, lout shot. we all flinched. >> reporter: witnesses say the shooter got into a silver-colored lincoln sedan with a getaway driver and took off. authorities called it a bold assassination. >> absolutely gone. nowhere to be found. >> reporter: that he vanished was made harder to believe, because he was in an area crowded with tourists and surveillance cameras. >> the sheer fact he shot him in the back of the head, tells me this was planned and directed. >> reporter: the friends and family are shocked. he attended prep school. and had ties to the hip-hop industry. >> kind heart. smart. really good person. >> reporter: but sources tell abc news, woodard had some run-ins with police. he reportedly was expected in court january 22nd in beverly hills, on a felon
sick texan living in new york. so he's very excited. and also, rumors that jennifer aniston is pregnant. she declined booze and sushi over the weekend, things you're supposed to stay away from while pregnant. >> it will be a beautiful kid if it's true. >>> also, the j.r. ewing tv character, larry hagman passed away over thanksgiving weekend. tnt was already in plans to bring back the show "dallas." apparently now they're going to have a funeral for the character on the show. a fitting sends-off. >> and finally, the annual list of the 99 most desirable list of women. jennifer lawrence jumping 46 spots. voters said she's more authentic. as for the top five, rihanna, emma stone. your girl, kim k., dropping to 98, nearly out of the running. >> i demand a recount. >> you got that right. got that right. t right. [ scratching ] you're not using too much are you, hon? ♪ nope. [ female announcer ] charmin ultra soft is so soft you'll have to remind your family they can use less. charmin ultra soft is made with extra cushions that are soft and more absorbent. plus you can use four times less ve
bill clinton. >> i'm not american so i can't really tell, can i. >i. >> sean: can you do a new york accent? >> i'm not going to try. >> >> sean: how you doing. talk radio, coffee. >> coffee. >> how you doin. great to see you. thank you for being on the show. >> sean: sadly, that's all the time we have left this evening. as always, thank you for being with us. let not your heart be troubled. the news continues. we will see you back here on monday. >> good morning to you, it's saturday, december 8th. so it's the middle of the weekend which is good news. i'm ainsley earhardt filling in for alisyn this morning. no end in sight for the fiscal cliff hanger. >> when it comes to the fiscal cliff threatening our economy and jobs the white house has wasted another wee>> why speaker says the president's my way or the highway approach is getting us nowhere. >> the feds are borrowing nearly a billion dollars a day. so why is the white house saying reducing our debt not really the goal? >> thank you, eric, it's the most watched video on the internet of all time. he is set to perform for the presi
an apartment, it was not that valuable. >> it's not practical for a new york city dweller, for instance. >> when you get houses, you see the mexican properties? i'm saying they're going up there. >> oh, really? >> yeah. if anybody wants one. >> available for weekend rental. >> semiautomatic weapon included. >> somebody stole it from me, he thought i was going to stop there, and let hem get away with it, and that's not really my style. >> would you kidnap jim cramer, david? i'm not sure. >> no. >> it would end there. >> it never ends. >> if the guy had done nothing, i would have said fib. but i found him -- no one has seen "taken 2." >> how could you not? what a great franchise. >> i know. >> she's been taken. >> really bad luck. >> when we come back, apple tv, microsoft surface tablets, we'll bring you the latest development regarding both of those. more from the deal book conference in manhattan, including an exclusive with lloyd feinstein. 11:00 a.m. eastern time. hanging on to gains. at the nyse, when we return. can i help you? i heard you guys can ship ground for less than the ups s
carthy and i from new york introduced this bill earlier this session after the terrible shootings in aurora which are right outside my congressional district. we tried to push for this bill. it's only a step of what we need to do, but to be honest, you're never going to stop some seriously deranged person from trying to shoot again. but what you can do is stop them from having these magazines that will kill 26 people in a ten-minute period. and so we're urging -- the bill's ready. we signed up 16 people in one hour this morning. we think that speaker boehner could bring it to the floor this week and show the country that we're really making some positive first steps to keeping these serious, serious weapons out of the hands of people who are criminals or who are seriously mentally ill. >> so you think that it's possible to bring this to the floor of the house this week? >> we could do it. it's been introduced. it's ripe. we have a number of co-sponsors. then the first of the year we're going to work with senator feinstein and others to do a more comprehensive bill to deal with the assault w
with the same sort of problem in new york city . listen to how he handled it >> i was given a report that said you have to raise taxes and said nothing about reducing spending. i was not an economic expert. i became one after becoming mayor in new york. i said it makes no sense. if i raises tax now. i will have to do it in two or four years. i will try to do something different. lower taxings. i in the beginning but a little bit and two or three years lower taxings. we had a three billion surplus and unemployment dropped from 10.5 to six percent . the city was humming. bowles is rightt, this is a spending problem. >> steve: absolutely. the thing is if washington simply when we send our taxings. if they sent it wisely it would be one thing. but you hear about so much waste and stuff going by the side . they want more taxes. you think they will those efficiently? of course not. >> gretchen: you want to know the newest powerball winner. why his financial advisors are telling him to take the money and ruin now before the fiscal cliff. >> brian: millions of dollars in a green company only to sell i
. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentlelady from new york, ms. clarke, for five minutes. ms. clarke: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise to congratulate the outgoing chairman of the congressional black caucus, the remped and representative emanuel cleaver ii of missouri, who is my colleague and good friend. representative cleaver has graciously served with distinction in the house of representatives and the fifth congressional district of missouri for nearly eight years. he's been an outstanding chairman to the congressional black caucus, ushering the caucus to its 40th anniversary. he cares deep loar for all americans, children, seen -- deeply for all americans, children, seniors. who could forget his demonstrative leadership on the c.b.c. jobs tour where tens of thousands of americans lined up for an opportunity to present themselves to employers? from creating economic opportunity, supporting quality education to our children, for creating equal access to health care for all americans, chairman cleaver is truly -- has truly been the embodiment of the conscience of the congress
: another headline from "the new york times," "fiscal talks he up." boehner talks about where he will find allegiance within his party, the article also talks about where they will find support in the house from democrats. "no signs of reaching a deal revealed." as part of this so-called fix -- fiscal cliff, what tax deductions would you give up? fort lauderdale, hello. caller: hello. good morning. i feel that i would be willing to give up some of my medicare benefits. i currently get free shoes and other benefits from medicare that i would be willing to give up. host: anything that you would be willing to give up on your taxes? items that you have in the past? caller: i would be willing to give up my charitable deductions. host: how come? caller: i feel that i give part of it to my charitable deductions. host: would you still make donations to charity if you could not write it off on your taxes? caller: yes, i would. host: thank you for your call. joe? caller: i would be willing to give up earned income credit and i liked what the last caller said about modifying the amount for charitable
the "new york times," this is what they write where they stand in their progress right now. and there is a disagreement about stimulus funding and whether or not that is included in some overall deal. we will talk more about this from a democrat from pennsylvania coming up here on the "washington journal" later on the program. but i want to stick to our topic here this morning. role of federal state governments and mental health. we'll go to an independent caller from pennsylvania. caller, what's your name? caller: hello? host: hi. what's your name, caller? caller: yes. the role of the government in mental health, i believe, should be stepped up and i think it's directly related to the health care industry in particular. the obama care or whatever type of health program is needed because as someone said earlier, most people do not have enough financial weather withtoll be able to assist people that they know maybe in their family or in their neighbors or the communities to help them. and i'm amazed how when we hear about an event like this, people are amazed that so much vi
and pennsylvania fellows and new york fellows were all good to me. >> like your colleague, daniel akaka and former transportation chairman norman, world war ii was important in the event in their lives and in your life as well. you serve in the most highly decorated unit in the history of the united states army and received a bronze star, distinguished service cross and middle of honor. can you tell us what you learned from that experience, and how did that experience impact your public career? >> well, there are certain things that haunt me even to this day. and that is the realization of that the war can change a person's character and personality. one might be content and say i'm a good person. now, for example one week before i got into the service and put on my uniform i was and sunday school teacher and i sang in acquire. my mother was a devout methodist , christian temperance movement. they don't get any more difficult than that. the whole family was that way. then after training and going overseas, i recalled telling the first german -- killing the first german. the thing that haunts me is
, puerto ricans in new york and chicago who are very liberal, but we're starting to see the rise of foreign-born latinos and their children who tend to be more conservative. i mean, just look at the pew numbers. on abortion still the majority believe that abortion should be legal compared to about 40% of the rest of the population. marriage, that is shifting. it has certainly shifted in the past five years, but there's still a good chunk of that electorate that is very conservative when it comes to, to marriage. the question is with social issues is not are you going to scare voters away. we believe that those who vote exclusively for those issues are going to vote, are mostly religious people who are going to vote for the candidate who has the traditional positions. nobody's not going to vote against the candidate because of their position of marriage within the latino community. >> right. it's scary to me because it is a place where we're not looking, again, we're not looking to the future. as a republican, we're counting on the older ones and not looking to how the vote is going to chang
this columnist for "the new york times" is brilliant in writing. he's a great, great journalist and explains things so well. i really have great admiration for him. he wrote yesterday, "republicans have to realize they are going to have to cave in on tax rates." that's the way it is, mr. president. "they're going to have to cave on tax rates." then on tuesday, day before yesterday, the senior senator from maine, olympia snowe, urged house republican leaders to end the suspense for middle-class taxpayers. "they shouldn't have to wonder whether we will ultimately raise taxes on low- to middle-income people." i assure them we won't raise taxes on the middle class on the poor, is what ow olympia snowe said. yesterday it seemed every practical republican left in washington was suddenly willing to say out loud what we have known for weeks: the only remaining option is for the house to pass the senate bill. dozens of house republicans signed onto a letter urging speaker boehner to take the last hexit before the cliff. neither president obama nor democrats in congress have ever been ambiguous about
of allegiance will be led by the gentleman from new york, mr. higgins. mr. higgins: i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker pro tempore: the chair will entertain requests for one-minute speeches. for what purpose does the gentleman from south carolina rise? mr. wilson: madam speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. wilson: and to revise and extend my remarks. madam speaker, at midnight tonight, our nation is scheduled to fall off the fiscal cliff because the augusta chronicle editorial of december 2 is correct. quote, it's that stubborn adherence to big spending that is powering the momentum toward the fiscal cliff. halting base spending is what's going to stop it. end of editorial. over the past year, house republicans have passed effective bipartisan legislation to prevent the entire fiscal cliff. unfortunately, these bills remain stalled in the senate graveyard. th
for us. in the spring we experienced late freezes in michigan and new york and pennsylvania that wiped out fruit crops. a lot of small family farms, farms in northern michigan wiped out. in my home state late freezes in the spring caused cherry producers to lose practically their entire crop right off the bat. it warmed up, the buds came out, then they had a deep freeze; killed everything. our growers produce 75% of the u.s. supply of cherries. that's around 270 million pounds. and the cherry producers experienced 98% loss. now in our amendment, in the disaster bill and in the farm bill, we give them some help because they spent the rest of the crop year this year having to pay to maintain the orchards and the frees, eating the costs and hoping the trees will bounce back next year and produce a crop. so they have all the costs of maintaining everything but no revenue coming in. cherry producers were also forced to fight spreading diseases like cherry leaf spot and bacterial tinker, making the trees even more costly to maintain and at risk of loss. they didn't just lose their crop this
to be in a union than that is what that is just like if you live in new york or l.a. and saying you are going to pay taxes in that city. you might not like the administration of government, you might not like -- you will pay city taxes or you can move out of the city. you can change the process and get involved in the same way -- stuart: i understand point. [talking over each other] stuart: voting to make michigan a right to work state. that is the democratic process. that is what is happening here. >> these people on lawfully legally expressing their opinion today. we have a mess on our hands. stuart: let me throw this that you. in the last ten years the employment level, the number of jobs in right to work states has gone up 10%. the employment level in non right to work states like michigan has gone 1%. don't you think there's something to be said for being right to work in terms of getting more jobs to your state? good jobs at a toyota or honda? >> there is no more pro-business mayor in the state or the country but i can tell you as you know as a business reporter there tweet types of lie
. . mr. murphy: i yield to the gentleman from new york, mr. engel. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. engel: mr. speaker, i have been to newtown, connecticut, and it's less than an hour's drive from my congressional district. we mourn all the people who lost their lives on friday, including 20 elementary school children and six educators. over the past few years, we have seen innocent lives lost to gun violence in a supermarket parking lot in arizona, a movie theater in colorado, an army base in texas, a college campus in virginia and now an elementary school in connecticut. the weapons have spawned these tragedies and long past time that we control them. the second amendment guarantees the right to bear arms but does not guarantee an absolute right to military-style, high caliber, semi-automatic, combat-assault rifles with high capacity magazines to anybody who wants them. it just does not and must not let interest groups persuade us otherwise. we need restrictions and sensible gun control legislation. we need them here and we need them now. our children are counti
, is not on the news every night and cnn is not broadcasting from the shores of new york and new jersey -- that happened for a few days and then we've gone on to other pressing issues of the day. and as new challenges arise, the press attention will be diverted, as is natural. the problem is it may be natural but it's not necessarily good for people that have lost their homes, lost their businesses and without quick action from congress and robust, definitive, comprehensive support from the federal government, these individuals, these communities will not be able to recover. and i am living testimony as a senator from one of the state's hardest hit in recent memory from a natural disaster to really to be able to testify as almost an eyewitness -- as an eyewitness of what happened in the aftermath of hurricanes katrina and what is possible in this recovery for hurricane sandy. it's been over seven weeks since hurricane sandy claimed the lives of more than 130 americans, destroying -- and i want to correct the record -- 340,000 homes and 200,000 businesses. just to put that in comparison,
to walt in new york. welcome. >> caller: hi, steph. really love your show and i'm encouraged to find your group so cheerful so early in the morning. >> it's an act. >> stephanie: yeah. go ahead, walt. >> caller: the right to work shouldn't that be the right to be a slave law? >> stephanie: yeah that's what president obama said yesterday. the right to -- >> to work for nothing. >> stephanie: yeah to work cheap. the president on the fiscal cliff yesterday. >> obama: we can solve this problem. all congress needs to do is pass a law that would prevent a tax hike on the first $250,000 of everybody's income. >> stephanie: it's everybody. >> even the rich. >> stephanie: even your favorite top 1 percenters. >> good heaven's that lunch money. >> that's the electricity bill for mitt romney's car elevator. [♪ "world news tonight" theme ♪] >> stephanie: they held more negotiations yesterday, but neither side showed a willingness to give ground. the president said we make tough spending cuts on things we don't need, and we ask the wealthiest americans to pay their part. it's a
. nothing to stop the epidemic of senseless gun violence that plague not only our major cities like new york and chicago, but countless small towns throughout our nation, towns with names like newtown, aurora, tucson, dekalb, blacksburg and littleton. in the years i have been a member of this body, this house has not held a single hearing, not one to address gun violence. while over 30,000 americans die each year from gun violence, over 400 lives have been lost by gun violence in my hometown of chicago, people are dying every day. . we in this body are afraid to talk about it. the time has come for us to stop listening to the gun lobby and start listening to the american people. the fact is the majority of americans gun owning and not, desire commonsense, reasonable gun regulation. congress must no longer stand in the way of reasonable legislation, instead we must champion it. the american people want to see background checks required on all firearm purchases instead of the fractions of sales that get done today. 408% of u.s. gun sales are by private sellers who are not required to perform b
about middle class americans extended the tax cuts so they don't get hurt. "the new york times" editorial today on how the gop proposal says raising the medicare eligibility hurts working-class americans unable to work to 67. it's likely to increase health care costs. >> guest: with all respect in "the new york times" they are somewhat critical of republicans. they don't see the world the way that we do and that's fair enough. but having said that, look this is a good-faith effort, and the 67 figured that's something the president raised before and talked about in terms of his sight. so let's recognize the demographic reality. we have a lot longer than we used to live. >> host: you're talking abut raising the eligibility age from 65 to 67. that is an idea. >> guest: i probably would. it's in the context with what else we have out there. we've done that with social security. we give people a lot of time it's not like we do it tomorrow with anybody close. but again, we change the social security system it's not a surprise to me i want to get a check at 65 the way my dad did but i
metropolitan of boston, new york, l.a., and as a consequence of that, it can win elections but it always has difficulty enforcing the elections. it is somewhat ironic that party fell apart because of the slavery crisis. it was responsible for the whole idea of expansion westward and it was the issue of slavery in that territories -- what will the state is in the territories be? it fell apart as a consequence of its fundamental basis of american expansion westward. the whigs and the republicans were more or less opposed to expansion because they saw the expansion of slavery. in 1930 and 1931, republicans in the midst of the depression may have made the economic slump worse by doubling down on the terrace and the gold standard -- to colors of their post civil war policy that proved successful in the past but that were of doubtful at the sea in the new circumstances prevailing after the great war. what do i mean by that? the gold standard and the tariff worked as long as america is an out liar in a european dominated system. this is true all the way up to world war one so that the european powe
located at 26 east genesee street in baldwinsville, new york, as the corporal kyle schneider post office building. the speaker: without objection, when the house adjourns today it shall adjourn to meet at noon on monday, december 24, 2012, unless it sooner has received a message from the senate transmitting its concurrence in house concurrent resolution 146. in which case the house shall stand adjourned pursuant to that concurrent resolution. without objection, the house stands adjourned pursuant to that order. >> good morning. i'm president of the national rifle association of america and i'd like to welcome you here this morning for the purposes of beginning our discussion of the pop i can that's been on the minds of american parents across this country. and that is what do we do about the tragedies of the sort that struck in newtown connecticut to avoid such events in the future. like most americans, we were shocked by what happened. like all americans, we've been discussing all of the various options that are available to protect our children. and at this point we would like to share
families. >> may i inquire how much time on each side? >> 7 and 14 minutes. >> the gentleman from new york'. >> thank you. i yield 3 minutes to the gentleman from texas. >> recognized for 3 minutes. >> i thank the gentle lady and the chairman. when i mention the words hurricane sandy and the tragedy in newton, connecticut, many would wonder what do they have in common. an enormous gun tragedy and the loss of 26 lives, and americans suffering from a devastating storm. our hearts go out to those babies lost. it speaks to americans in need. that is why i am so trouble to be on the floor today. the framework we have says to america when you are in need, we will not be prepared to help you. what is disappointing, and i know for the speaker, it is probably the same case. just about three days ago, we thought there was a deal. between the white house and the framework offered. of this leadership house. it is disappointing. in the course of a couple of days, we have come to a situation where this plan, plan b, raises only about $300 billion from high income households. the centers for budget prior
? joining us now in studio, we welcome distinguished house members carolina maloney of new york and larry kudlow's house member in manhattan. and the republican from arizona. as always, welcome to both of you. dave, let me ask you this. i'm hearing a lot of this that there is a strategic retreat by the republican party. 57b and that they are not either in the house or senate going to block the middle class stax tax cuts which proliferate in terms of the bill. is that true, sir? >> i haven't been invited into the strategic retreat caucus. look. i hear more on the news than i ever actually come across in reality in d.c. so far, i do not see a willingness, particularly on the conservative side of the caucus, to give away our principles. >> i heard rand paul thursday night on this show. he sent a message to majority leader reed that he, rand paul, was a tea party caucus guy, free market guy, will not filibuster. he wants to get through it. he's going to vote against tax cuts but will not filibuster. there are a coup ohlele dozen house members, as you know, who signed the bipartisan letter say
are not allowed and individuals reside in states with high income tax. >> host: talking about new york, california -- >> guest: new york, california, d.c. however, is your previous guest of knowledge, if you do not enact the patch, a family of four, married couple with two children would begin to face the amt income levels as low as $70,000. it's been described as a blue state problem because of its impact on the estate tax deduction. it becomes every state problem becomes an additional tax. >> host: while we are talking here, if you wonder whether or not you follow in the amt and whether it impacts you, if you go to tax policy center.org, they have a calculator that would hope you plug in the numbers and figure out whether he would apply to you to do anything. we hear from joe first. republican caller, go ahead. >> host: yeah, on the alternative minimum tax, we didn't hear this discussed at all in this last election cycle and to me, we just heard about the very rich to get their income through stock, you know, paying only 15%. it seems to me it will affect them and they will affect the higher rat
bankrupt in new york history. 20 years ago it had automobiles and music. it seemed like the center of the universe. the fear is that the state review will show the city is broke. the way the city can avoid filing bankruptcy is to come to terms with their unions and creditors with their pensions and healthcare and other obligations. detroit is over $2 billion in debt and experts say it's unlikely they are going to come to terms. it also does not look like the president or the big banks will come to the rescue. chapter 9 is very expensive and it's a last ditch effort because it will lead to money going out the door and also to a lot of chaos. it's legally giving detroit about six months to get its books in order, to get its financial house in order. but if this review shows the city is in fact very cash strapped, well then it could speed up the entire bankruptcy process and we know for a fact that cash flow in the city of detroit is down to a trickle. alisyn: they have been in trouble for some time. thanks for the update. there is new hope for people suffering from alzheimer's diseas
of maryland. maryland was hit hard, not as hard as new jersey or new york, and our prayers go out to all the communities that have been affected. but maryland was hit pretty hard. we had sustained winds for hour after hour after hour after hour. we had rainfall records -- nine inches. we had storm surges of seven-feet waves. we had flooding on the eastern shore of maryland. we had a storm in the western part of our state that dumped -- dropped 30 inches of wet snow. so we suffered from the -- the flooding on the eastern shore and the storms in western maryland. many of the communities were people who live below poverty are elderly. senator mikulski was just on the floor and talked about the circumstances in the city of crisfield n. that city. in that city, 32% of the population live blo live below e poverty level. 71% sustained water damage. waterman, which is one of the major industries for that community, found that they were literally unable to work and they're still unclear as to what's going to happen to their crops. so we have a serious problem. give you just two examples of people
as an example. so let's just understand in this body so that there's no mistake that new york and surrounding areas will get their money because the principle of fema money and probably other disaster money as well is simply this -- at the beginning of a year, you have some money in fema, but you never know what the disasters are going to be throughout the next 12 months. but when a disaster is declared, there is money there to flow, and when that disaster money runs out, as far as i know, it's always been replaced. whether you have an earthquake in california or you have a hurricane in the gulf of mexico or you have drought in the midwest like we have or texas like we have or you have tornadoes like we have in the midwest, and sandy as the most recent example. as far as i know, there has never been any dispute under the laws at that time, and those laws don't change very often. they -- they do get the money out to the people that need it, and then when that fund goes dry, it is replenished by congress. now, unless somebody is seeking money other -- in some way other than other disasters that
position and yield to the gentleman from new york whose community is suffering and who has done an able job in helping manage this bill. the presiding officer: the senator from new york. mr. schumer: first, i want to thank my colleague from pennsylvania. he didn't try to knock out the whole thing, and we appreciate that. having said that, i would just urge any of my colleagues in disaster areas to think very carefully before they vote for this. this will be the first time ever when a disaster isn't declared that we have offset money for it. that will mean that disaster money will be much less ready available in the future. the precedent is an awful one. it is something that goes against 100 years of democrats, republicans, north, east, south and west voting when one area has trouble to send the money without spending months and months and months fighting about whether to cut this or cut that or raise these taxes or do this to offset it. and i would say we had this fight when irene came about, and 19 of our colleagues came to the wisdom that it was a bad idea to offset it, and we didn't. so
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)